Ephesus

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Ephesus  Symrna  Pergamum Thyatira Sardis Phildelphia Laodicea

Ephesus

According to tradition, the founder of Ephesus was Androklos, one of the sons of the legendary King Kodros. Like the other Ionian settlements, the city must have been colonized by the 10th century B. C, at the latest. On reaching this spot, the Ionians found that the mother goddess, Kybele, held sway as chief deity, as in almost every part of Anatolia. The original settlement is thought to have been established 1,200 m. west of the Artemision, at the port of Koressos. Towards the middle of the 6th century, it came under the sovereignty of Lydia then Persia. After the death of Alexander, Ephesus together with the whole of lonia, fell into the hands of Lysimachos, who had the foresight to re-establish the city on the northern slopes of Mt. Koressos and on the southern and western slopes of Mt. Pion.

Ephesus came under the joint rule of the Kingdom of Pergamon and the Romans until 133 BC and, like the other cities in Asia Minor, It was heavily taxed during the time of Julius Caesar; but in Augustus' reign there began a period lasting two hundred years, during which Ephesus passed through its most glorious and happy period. Ephesus was the most prosperous commercial center of that time and controlled the banking affairs of the whole of western Anatolia. The city of Ephesus was referred to as the metropolis of Asia, After a period famous in ancient history for strife and upheaval, lasting throughout the 3rd century AD and subsequently to the middle of the 4th century. Ephesus entered into a third golden age which continued until the Justinian era. With the rapid

expansion of Christianity in the area, many important and beautiful buildings came into being. Ephesus enjoyed a further period of prosperity in the Seljuk era, during the 14th century. In this time, the city occupied the area where the Ayasoluk Castle and the present day town of Seljuks now stand.

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Last modified: Kasım 26, 2006